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    Roa jayakari Trawled Up From The Depths of The Andaman Sea

    Awhile ago, the story of two extremely rare deep water butterflies was first shared here. The capture of not one, but two very rare Roa excelsa butterflyfishes made big news worldwide. Roa excelsa is a member of the genus Roa, which includes two other species. R. modestus and R. jayakari. Of the three, R. modestus […]

    roa jayakari

    Awhile ago, the story of two extremely rare deep water butterflies was first shared here. The capture of not one, but two very rare Roa excelsa butterflyfishes made big news worldwide. Roa excelsa is a member of the genus Roa, which includes two other species. R. modestus and R. jayakari.

    Of the three, R. modestus is the most common and is sometimes offered for sale in Japan. The other two are extremely rare and found at extreme depths. R. excelsa is found in Guam and the Hawaiian Islands. The other species, R. jayakari, is seldom heard of and it’s lesser known compared to the other two species.

    Not too long ago, a specimen of R. jayakari was trawled up from a fishing boat in the Andaman Sea, in the waters near Thailand. The specimen was a good sized individual, about 3 inches, and a shame that it had to arrive like this, for it would have made a spectacularly rare and impressive specimen. R. jayakari is not recorded in Thailand and its range was previously thought to only cover the Red Sea to the West coast of India. This makes it a new record for Thailand.

    The butterflyfish was trawled up by accident and was mixed with other food fish. Another impressive member on board the ship was this Decodon pacificus.

    Decodon pacificus

    Very little is known about D. pacificus, except that it is mostly found in the Northwestern Pacific, in Taiwan and Japan. It was also trawled up from the depths of the Andaman Sea in Thailand, and like R. jayakari, is a new record for the area!

    Thank you to Ohm Pavaphon for the pictures and exciting insights on these rare fishes.

    5 Comments

    1. February 27, 2011 at 8:32 PM | Permalink

      Wow, that wrasse is awesome!

    2. Clarionreef
      February 28, 2011 at 3:15 AM | Permalink

      If people claiming to care about the aquarium trades impact only knew how many tropical fish were dredged up from fish and shrimp trawlers they would be have to re-think their concern.
      The tonnage is staggering and if I didn’t work on shrimp trawlers myself I would have a hard time believing it. Thousands of deepwater butterfly fishes die in this way.
      At least the aquarium trade creates value, income and livlihood out of the fish they take. Trawlers just shovel it all over the side.
      Steve

    3. Ohm Pavaphon
      February 28, 2011 at 2:06 PM | Permalink

      Agree with Steve, Aquarium trade creates the value of these ‘living’ specimens. Many of the ‘rare’ and ‘expensive’ deep water fishes were end up as a food fish or trash fish for making an animal food without anyone concern, since they got no market value for those villegers and fisherman.

    4. April 21, 2011 at 5:52 AM | Permalink

      Basically fresh water aquarium fish are grouped into either live-bearers,certain fish can be very big, each fish have their unique appearances,aquarium fish are very colorful and attractive

    5. April 21, 2011 at 6:10 AM | Permalink

      It is generally a great idea to plan out what type fish we would like to keep in your aquarium,there are various types of fish,goldfish is one of the most popular pet fish in the world

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