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    Tailless Clownfish Are Just Weird

    Recently Mother Nature has thrown in her two cents on the designer clownfish debate with the Lightning Maroon Clownfish, showing that she may actually make the best “designer clowns” of all. But whether they are natural creations or imposed by humans, sometimes variants are just weird. Take, for example, these wild caught Amphiprion ocellaris tailless […]

    Recently Mother Nature has thrown in her two cents on the designer clownfish debate with the Lightning Maroon Clownfish, showing that she may actually make the best “designer clowns” of all. But whether they are natural creations or imposed by humans, sometimes variants are just weird.

    Take, for example, these wild caught Amphiprion ocellaris tailless clownfish that made their way to Reborn Aquarium in Singapore. These clowns lack tails and any resemblance of a caudal peduncle. Their double humped rear is 1/2 dorsal fin and 1/2 anal fin!

    The next Platinum Perc? Methinks not. But touché to nature for keeping us on our toes…

    13 Comments

    1. The808state
      June 21, 2010 at 10:27 PM | Permalink

      There is a certain point where we have to stop this mutant breeding.

    2. June 21, 2010 at 11:07 PM | Permalink

      @the808,

      Can you clarify?

      Do you mean stop nature, as in kill these particular fish, or, the captive bred designer clown trend?

      These fish are reportedly wild caught. See publisher's response to Jake's (coralite) question.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWaafpytFuI&feat

    3. June 22, 2010 at 8:06 AM | Permalink

      Ok that is just plain wild. I've never seen that before.

    4. Frode
      June 22, 2010 at 10:48 AM | Permalink

      Is this a mutant, or are they cut / bitten? I once had a fresh water cichlid fish with no tail where the dorsal and anal fins grew like this. This fish had lost it's tail to another fish when he was you…just a nasty bite …

    5. Frode
      June 22, 2010 at 10:49 AM | Permalink

      I ment when it was young, not you 😉

    6. AndyNarwhal
      June 22, 2010 at 3:45 PM | Permalink

      I doubt these fish are wild caught. Tail clipping is a common practice in Singapore and is done to mollies and parrot cichlids commercially. The caudal peduncle is cut off the fish at a young age and then allowed to heal. If you think about it the chances of this occuring naturally are probably one in a million, and for the fish to survive long enough to reach this size even more improbable. Then add in the fact that you are looking at TWO fish with the same improbable rates of survival to this point and you really see that there is more going on here than meets the eye.

    7. Neverdie
      June 22, 2010 at 5:02 PM | Permalink

      I have to agree with Andy practical fishkeeping has reported extensively on the topic.
      http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/content.p
      it was no doubt only a matter of time before this practice was seen in the saltwater end of the hobby

    8. June 22, 2010 at 9:39 PM | Permalink

      coming from asia … and two of them. I just don't believe they are wild occurring.

    9. June 22, 2010 at 9:43 PM | Permalink

      @Neverdie, Andy and Frode

      Thanks for chiming in guys, your input is much appreciated. I do agree that this can be done via human intervention. However, it has also occurred in wild collected marine fish. I've personally seen it on a sub-adult Pomacanthid.

      The big question is if this is genetic or physically induced. Although likely the later, as these are clowns, it would be interesting to see if the pair could spawn and what the resulting juveniles would look like.

    10. William Crook
      June 22, 2010 at 11:38 PM | Permalink

      I have had a potter angel without a tail before. Wild caught. I don't know if it is from a injury when it was young or if it was born that way.

      William Crook

    11. AndyNarwhal
      June 24, 2010 at 6:55 PM | Permalink

      I am sure this deformity happens in nature sporadically. But to a single individual here and there. Not TWO fish of the same age at once! Occam’s razor states roughly that the simplest explanation is usually the right one. In this case the fact that tail mutilation is common place in SE Asia and that the odds of two fish of the same age with the same deformity is orders of magnitude less likely to happen one needs to assume the former and not the latter. This practice is barbaric and should be discouraged at all times. What’s next? Tattooed Yellow tangs with big heart signs on them?

    12. AndyNarwhal
      June 24, 2010 at 1:55 PM | Permalink

      I am sure this deformity happens in nature sporadically. But to a single individual here and there. Not TWO fish of the same age at once! Occam's razor states roughly that the simplest explanation is usually the right one. In this case the fact that tail mutilation is common place in SE Asia and that the odds of two fish of the same age with the same deformity is orders of magnitude less likely to happen one needs to assume the former and not the latter. This practice is barbaric and should be discouraged at all times. What's next? Tattooed Yellow tangs with big heart signs on them?

    13. Sara S.
      June 3, 2014 at 8:35 PM | Permalink

      look pretty much like tomato clown shape. Its probably a hybrid.

    3 Trackbacks

    1. […] clown no tail. http://glassbox-design.com/2010/tailless-clownfish/ __________________ 240G FISH ONLY IN PROGRESS 24G CURRENT CARDIFF REEF. 65G MIXED REEF. HI […]

    2. […] I at least want an x-ray of these and normal clowns to compare but either way it is kinda creepy. Tailless Clownfish Are Just Weird | glassbox-design.com __________________ My Bongo Shrimp Want To Eat Your Starfish. […]

    3. […] http://glassbox-design.com/2010/lightning-maroon-clownfish-png/ http://glassbox-design.com/2010/tailless-clownfish/ http://indmas.org/main/index.php?showtopic=5898 […]

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