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    Profilux Doser Maintenance : Cleaning Pump Heads

    I’ve been using the Profilux standalone doser for just over 6 months now which means it’s time for some pump cleaning. In the time the unit has been in operation, the Profilux standalone doser has worked extremely well–the only mark against it has been an infrequent noise. Roughly one month ago a single pump began creating […]

    Profilux Standalone Doser

    I’ve been using the Profilux standalone doser for just over 6 months now which means it’s time for some pump cleaning. In the time the unit has been in operation, the Profilux standalone doser has worked extremely well–the only mark against it has been an infrequent noise. Roughly one month ago a single pump began creating an intermittent high pitched noise when in operation.

    Having used an array of peristaltic pumps, including the Thomas motors used here, it as not a surprise. Friction happens, but thankfully it can be remedied with a quick cleaning.

    The goal of disassembling the pump heads was to remove any debris within the rollers and on the shaft while also cleaning out any build up within the tubing. Thankfully a simple wipe down of the components with a dry cloth and a light rinse of the tubing managed to take care of the above while also eliminating the noise that was occurring on the third pump.

    Full instructions on this pump maintenance can be found on GHL’s Service Forums. Note that GHL states that self service is not covered under warranty. We are unsure of the details of this potential issue, but GHL does advise servicing the pumps every 6 months. We received the Profilux doser free of charge to review and admittedly had little hesitation to take it apart. If this makes you uneasy, contact your retailer.

    Profilux Dosing Pump

    The pump heads detach from the dosing unit using four clips. A small screw driver can be used to pop these off and remove the head. Be cognizant that the shaft remains connected to the dosing unit and only the white plastic portion is removed.

    Here you can see the clips which take a little finesse to remove.

    Profilux Doser

    The three peristaltic rollers are kept in place by the plastic backplate. Remove these first before touching the tubing–it all comes out quite easily. When finally removing the tubing, do not change the positioning of the black plastic clips on the tubing. These set the resistance of the rollers. The pumps actually function like a gear, with the shaft spinning the three rollers which creates a controlled rate of flow that cannot back siphon.

    To clean the tubing I actually connected it to the waste water line of our RO/DI unit. With some light massaging, any build up inside is quickly flushed out. After re-assembling the unit be sure to re-calibrate in case of any change in flow rates.

    Overall the cleaning took 15 minutes for the 4 pump heads, and this included snapping a few pictures. The unit is back working quietly, dosing balling solutions up to 24 times a day. I’m still very please with the Profilux Doser and will continue to employ it on the glassbox–the control and easy of use are difficult to beat.

    4 Comments

    1. February 18, 2010 at 9:41 AM | Permalink

      Looks a bit easier than changing tubing on the LM3. Getting the rollers back on and getting the tubing to line back up properly on that thing is absolutely maddening! Too bad this post serves as a reminder that one of my pumps is beeping at me to inspect also 🙁

    2. February 18, 2010 at 12:39 PM | Permalink

      Nice write up Eric. I still have a few months before I hit the 6 month mark but so far Im loving this doser….

    3. February 20, 2010 at 8:26 AM | Permalink

      Hi,

      Hope Eric does not mind us chiming in, I just wished to add some further important information which will help add to this great write up.

      We recommend as a maximum cleaning every six months, it depends really on what you are doing, if you are dosing liquids with no solid suspension, such a vodka then 6 months is fine, however and this applies especially to balling, it is recommended to clean the pumps bi monhtly when dosing things such as calcium Chloride, and sodium bicarb.

      Both minerals have a great habit of blocking tubing and this will create back pressure on any dosing pump motor. This is why we recommend cleaning bi monthly and tube replacment every 6 months.

      Of course if the unit has already started to get noisy it is a warning sign you have already gone past the point where cleaning is paramount.

      In regards to warranty, the only reason it is stated that it is not covered is due to the fact we have no control over “butter fingers” 😉 but the processdure is pretty much childs play.

      Hope this added info helps.

    4. February 20, 2010 at 2:26 PM | Permalink

      Hi,

      Hope Eric does not mind us chiming in, I just wished to add some further important information which will help add to this great write up.

      We recommend as a maximum cleaning every six months, it depends really on what you are doing, if you are dosing liquids with no solid suspension, such a vodka then 6 months is fine, however and this applies especially to balling, it is recommended to clean the pumps bi monhtly when dosing things such as calcium Chloride, and sodium bicarb.

      Both minerals have a great habit of blocking tubing and this will create back pressure on any dosing pump motor. This is why we recommend cleaning bi monthly and tube replacment every 6 months.

      Of course if the unit has already started to get noisy it is a warning sign you have already gone past the point where cleaning is paramount.

      In regards to warranty, the only reason it is stated that it is not covered is due to the fact we have no control over “butter fingers” 😉 but the processdure is pretty much childs play.

      Hope this added info helps.

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