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    New World Transparent Specimens Turns Preservation Into Modern Art

    New World Transparent Specimens is the latest work from Japanese artist Iori Tomita. Using a method that dissolves an animals natural proteins, Tomita is able to preserve these deceased animals with striking detail–highlighting the finest and most delicate skeleton structures. To further enhance the visual appeal of these ornate skeletons, Tomita selectively injects different colored [...]

    new world transparent specimens

    New World Transparent Specimens is the latest work from Japanese artist Iori Tomita. Using a method that dissolves an animals natural proteins, Tomita is able to preserve these deceased animals with striking detail–highlighting the finest and most delicate skeleton structures.

    To further enhance the visual appeal of these ornate skeletons, Tomita selectively injects different colored dies into hard bones and soft bones to create a 3-d effect. Without the addition of the dye, the animals remain translucent.

    Tomita once worked as a Fisherman. Thankfully for us, his ties to that industry and his fondness of marine creatures are ubiquitous through the collection.

    new world transparent specimens

    New World Transparent Specimens are available for purchase through Tokyu Hands in Japan at price ranging from ¥2,000 – ¥20,000. Additionally, if you can stomach the price, specific animals can be  commissioned.

    If you’re in Japan and would rather look than buy, Iori Tomita will be displaying these amazing works at the Tokyo Mineral Show from December 10-13 at Sunshine City.

    [cool hunting, nwts]

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    • http://www.fruciano.it/research/ Carmelo Fruciano

      While I agree that the specimens in the pictures are well cleared and stained, I would like to add that clearing and staining fish specimens is, since long, a widespread practice in scientific research.
      As a consequence, I think that the first part of the article sounds a little misleading…saying “Tomita is able to preserve” sounds like it’s an exclusive technique that this artist (and not many others) do, while it’s quite the opposite, it’s a well known techniques which has been used by an artist (who is also selling specimens)!

    • Pingback: Iori Tomita | who killed bambi?