• GBD videos on vimeo
  • subscribe : rss feed
  • Entry

    ‘Full Barred’ Captive Bred Latezonatus Clownfish from Karen Brittain

    Look out Latz lovers! Amphiprion latezonatus, commonly known as the wide-band or Latezonatus clownfish, is one of the most desired yet least obtainable species for anemonefish enthusiasts. Their characteristic wide center stripe that broadens with age, distinguishes them from every other species of clownfish. Wild collected “Latz”, as they are affectionately known, have trickled into […]

    amphiprion-latezonatus

    Look out Latz lovers! Amphiprion latezonatus, commonly known as the wide-band or Latezonatus clownfish, is one of the most desired yet least obtainable species for anemonefish enthusiasts. Their characteristic wide center stripe that broadens with age, distinguishes them from every other species of clownfish. Wild collected “Latz”, as they are affectionately known, have trickled into the market in very small numbers for years. Unfortunately many have met their demise due a host of diseases and maladies that are often encountered with wild caught clownfish.

    Amphiprion latezonatus is an Australian endemic, ranging from Southern Queensland to Northern New South Wales and Lord Howe Island, hundreds of miles away from the vast majority of saltwater aquarium fish collection to the north. Even worse than their remote location, most individuals are collected as large specimens, which ship poorly and have much less of a chance to adapt to aquarium life. Throw in an epidemic of seemingly inexplicable blindness and it’s enough to make your head spin.

    captive bred amphiprion latezonatus

    Recently hope grew when news broke that captive raised Latz would finally be available on the market. This excitement was short-lived when it was realized that on those captive bred Latz the famous wide center stripe, was misbarred… they were wide-band clownfish without the wide band! The desire for captive-bred Latezonatus with the same beauty of their wild caught cousins went back to being a dream. Thanks to Karen Brittain, it’s now a reality.

    amphiprion latezonatus

    In September I met up with biologist and fish breeder Karen Brittain at her home on the island of Oahu. Karen is best known for her accomplishments at the Waikiki Aquarium, when in 2002 she became just the second person in the world to successfully spawn and raise saltwater angelfish in captivity. Karen is also known for having spawned and raised clownfish for years, supplying the US market with many different species of impeccable quality. Karen definitely has a “blue thumb” when it comes to breeding fish.

    Amphiprion latezonatus

    When I heard that she had produced captive-bred Latezonatus clowns that “appeared wild”, I had to see it myself. As I anxiously walked into her breeding room I was amazed to see healthy captive-bred Latz completely indistinguishable from their wild counterparts. What a sight! The pictures speak for themselves.

    karen brittain captive bred

    Karen Brittain & John ‘Copps’ Coppolino, flanked by HI based wholesalers William Crook (L) and DJ Linehan (R)

    Editors Note: These first Amphiprion latezonatus specimens are currently available in limited numbers. Aquarists in the U.S. can order direct from Aqualife Unlimited. Additionally they will be made available to local fish stores both domestically and internationally via two major wholesalers from Oahu.

    Congratulations to Karen! We wish her continued success with her breeding programs.

    11 Comments

    1. October 27, 2010 at 1:30 PM | Permalink

      Excellent news!

    2. October 27, 2010 at 1:42 PM | Permalink

      what’s the secret for the perfect stripes?

    3. Justin
      October 27, 2010 at 5:14 PM | Permalink

      This is news I look forward to. I love my maroons to death, but MAN would I love a pair of these.

    4. Will-I-Am
      October 27, 2010 at 5:21 PM | Permalink

      Great article John.

    5. The808state
      October 27, 2010 at 5:32 PM | Permalink

      I have a pair of these Latz… They both ate 5 minutes after introduction to my tank. Best part is my tank is running from 79-83 degrees and they are both doing extremely well.

    6. Umm, fish?
      October 28, 2010 at 1:26 AM | Permalink

      Yay! Go Karen!

    7. clippingimages
      October 28, 2010 at 7:42 AM | Permalink

      excellent news 🙂

    8. Ben
      October 29, 2010 at 3:53 AM | Permalink

      Good to see you on board, John – look forward to more articles 🙂 it’s nice to see CB Latz looking like their WC counterparts. Had a few locally caught ones over the years but they’re typically far too fickle to last long. Hopefully this success with breeding will spread worldwide so we can finally have some here in Australia!

    9. October 29, 2010 at 3:23 PM | Permalink

      Thanks so much guys, and congrats again to Karen! The only things that surpass her breeding skills are her charming demeanor and cool personality!

    10. October 29, 2010 at 5:16 PM | Permalink

      John, Congrats on your first article for GBD.

    11. November 9, 2010 at 4:43 AM | Permalink

      Wow, these CB Latz look great. Hmm….

    7 Trackbacks

    1. October 27, 2010 at 8:24 AM

      […] […]

    2. October 27, 2010 at 12:51 PM

      […] Originally Posted by Aloha Corals Not for long… Captive Bred Amphiprion Latezonatus Clownfish I quoted myself… how lame. k3v ~INSERT COOL SIG HERE~ Reply With Quote […]

    3. November 1, 2010 at 11:59 PM

      […] From GBD […]

    4. […] bars. Here's a couple of pairs that were sold previously…. And more info on these fish Captive Bred Amphiprion Latezonatus Clownfish Reply With Quote     + Reply to Thread « Shortcake […]

    5. […] bars. Here's a couple of pairs that were sold previously…. And more info on these fish Captive Bred Amphiprion Latezonatus Clownfish http://www.reefodyssey.com Reply With Quote   + Reply to Thread […]

    6. […] Have a look here: http://glassbox-design.com/2010/capt…n-latezonatus/ it might help you Cheers Pedro Nuno __________________ "I may of course, be egregiously […]

    7. April 24, 2011 at 1:36 AM

      […] […]

    Post a Comment

    Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

    *
    *