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    Banks in, Declivis Out of The Glassbox

    Sometimes mixing fish does not work as planned, and when this happens its important to have a back up plan. As I mentioned last month, after a year of cohabitation and friendliness with one another our Chaetodon declivis and Roaops hybrid had a serious falling out. After removing the Declivis for one week it was […]

    prognathodes aya

    Sometimes mixing fish does not work as planned, and when this happens its important to have a back up plan. As I mentioned last month, after a year of cohabitation and friendliness with one another our Chaetodon declivis and Roaops hybrid had a serious falling out. After removing the Declivis for one week it was clear the personality and confidence of the hybrid would take months, not weeks, to recover. In light of this I was forced to pass along my favorite fish to a friend. Knowing the C. declivis would pick up on any weakness shown by the Hybrid, I did not bother trying to reintroduce Declivis into the display.

    It was not an easy decision to make, but logically it made the most sense. The Declivis was the largest fish and it was obvious that to add new Chaetodon species it would take some time and a good bit of luck. The Declivis was sent packing and it now resides in a friend’s beautiful aquarium. I must give a big thanks to Ian and Jim at Old Town Aquarium. The situation came up just days before a trip. Old Town came to the rescue and helped shipped the fish out in just enough time for me to leave my desk, yes I have an office job, for a break and make it back in time to wrap up some lingering projects before catching a flight out.

    While I do miss the bright colors and bold personality of the Declivis, the stress this fish created caused the Roaops hybrid to darken and lose much of its yellow coloration over the past few months reverting to near black C. burgessi markings[see above]. Since being the only Roaops species in the tank the, Hybrid has rebounded becoming more adventurous and is exhibiting more yellow each and every day. I suspect in a few months the eye band will revert back to full yellow.

    prognathodes aya

    As for the Bank Butterflyfish (Prognathodes aya) the fish has intermixed well with minimal aggression from the P. marcellae. Unfortunately I suspect the fish was injured in shipping or had a prior bacterial infection as the specimen has terrible eye sight and difficulty eating, despite trying repeatedly.  Everyday it is battle against a catabolic state. On a good day the fish will consumer 4-5 mysis in a day. This is in addition to grazing, but not enough to sustain the fish long term. We’re now trying a variety of foods to try and keep the fish in the display [after mixing well with the Marcellae] but I suspect the fish will need to be removed again to find a specialized eating program that works for the fish.

    Prognathodes often struggle eating food out of the water column and I originally suspected this was the case. It was clearly attracted to the food and getting some in QT, but after watching the fish’s behavior and continued attempts to eat it is clear some vision impairment is at play. You can’t win ’em all.

    4 Comments

    1. David O.
      June 15, 2010 at 10:41 AM | Permalink

      Eric,

      Looks great! Happy to hear things are going fairly well. With some time maybe the Banks will eat better. My Prognathodes took a while to start eating well. It is interesting too, my fish much prefers mysis off the sand bed versus in the water column. Also, thanks for encouraging people to push the limit and keep butterflies in reef settings! It's worked out great for me!

      -David

    2. jmaneyapanda
      June 21, 2010 at 8:59 PM | Permalink

      Butterflies are the new angels!! 🙂 Update soon!

    3. jmaneyapanda
      June 21, 2010 at 3:59 PM | Permalink

      Butterflies are the new angels!! 🙂 Update soon!

    4. Wayne
      November 15, 2010 at 10:30 PM | Permalink

      What temperaturerange do you suggest these fish do well in? I’m thinking in particular of the marcellae?

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