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    What’s it like to Scuba Dive down to 400ft?

    There are two names that every rare fish nerd should know, Jack Randall and Richard Pyle. Without the work and dedication of these two ichthyologists, many of the most coveted and beautiful species in the trade would be unknown. Here is a talk by Richard Pyle on his life’s work that was given at TED2004 […]

    There are two names that every rare fish nerd should know, Jack Randall and Richard Pyle. Without the work and dedication of these two ichthyologists, many of the most coveted and beautiful species in the trade would be unknown. Here is a talk by Richard Pyle on his life’s work that was given at TED2004 in Monterrey, California. It’s refereshing to that once a fish geek always a fish geek. The passion Richard Pyle has for these beautiful animals is infectious.

     

    You can read a follow up interview, where Richard discusses Pyle stops, Conservation, and the unfortunate circumstance that found him in the middle of Thrasher Sharks: TED Interview with Richard Pyle

    In addition to this video, here’s a second one showing Richard and Brian Greene taking a deep (and cold) dive down to 400 feet. The video is titled A Christmas Chill: An Encounter with Hypothermia-Induced Tourette Syndrome … the title certainly does it justice. ” Tourettes” + Helium = A Good Laugh.

    WARNING: This video contains language that is inappropriate for children, and may be offensive to some adults. In search of new species of fishes, a pair of marine biologists descend down a deep coral-reef drop-off in the central Pacific, using high-tech closed-circuit rebreathers and breathing a mixture containing mostly helium. As they pass a depth of 320 feet on the way down, they discover what it feels like to penetrate a thermocline from the balmy 85-degree equatorial sea-surface temperatures, to the 50-degree deep upwelled water below. The diver carrying the camera, who was wearng only a t-shirt and swimsuit under his rebreather gear, had no idea that every helium-affected word he was saying was being picked up by the camera’s microphone

    And if those two videos are not enough to satisfy your inner fish geek, here’s a brief clip from the Discovery Channel, showing Richard Pyle and John Earle resolving some technical difficulties while diving. Enjoy!

    5 Comments

    1. March 10, 2009 at 12:04 PM | Permalink

      i think i’ll stay within recreational limits lol…funny it didn’t sound like they really planned the dive=P

    2. March 10, 2009 at 12:50 PM | Permalink

      So … apparently it’s cold then? LOL

    3. March 10, 2009 at 9:46 PM | Permalink

      In the past I’ve thought diving deep is probably more tedium than scary, but after getting the chance to go ~85 feet in Cozumel last week, I have a totally different view on this — that takes some major guts and training.

    4. March 10, 2009 at 10:22 PM | Permalink

      Just watched both videos, very interesting stuff. I really love TED presentations, and scuba, and fish, so that was pretty phenomenal.

    5. Richard from Texas
      November 19, 2009 at 7:35 AM | Permalink

      i think they are cold

    2 Trackbacks

    1. […] to get a direct link to the google video, but here’s the site I found it at at (scroll down a bit): Ichthyologist Richard Pyle on deep sea diving with closer circuit rebreathers and rare fish | glassb… […]

    2. […] to such depths is extremely dangerous and only doable with a Closed Circuit Rebreather. (See Richard Pyle’s TED talk on the twilight zone) This particular dive went smoothly, up until the end. Their planned 5 hour decompression time was […]

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