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    The Vibrant Candycane Goby (Trimma cana)

    Just 5 years ago small marine gobies of the Trimma genus were a rare sight in the industry. Long ignored by both collectors and hobbyists it has been fairly recent that these small, inquisitive fishes have become available on a regular basis. One such species, is the red stripped or candycane goby (Trimma cana). T. canna posing […]

    Just 5 years ago small marine gobies of the Trimma genus were a rare sight in the industry. Long ignored by both collectors and hobbyists it has been fairly recent that these small, inquisitive fishes have become available on a regular basis. One such species, is the red stripped or candycane goby (Trimma cana).

    Trimma-cana

    T. canna posing nearby a forest of Ricordea and Zoanthids. Click photo to enlarge.

    Trimma cana is slowly being found on the stock lists of many online vendors, local fish stores, and wholesalers–and rightfully so. This small Western Pacific goby is hardy, vibrant and adds a unique form factor that can greatly enhance the sense of scale in your reef. As an example the specimen above is roughly half an inch in length, but proportionally the fish makes the entire nano-reef scene appear much larger than it actually is. (Note, this particular fish was very orange and shows the color variability in the species. Most range from scarlet red to vermilion. See this photo for comparison ).

    At $20 to $30 T. cana may create sticker shock due to its diminutive size, but don’t be scared to try one in your aquarium. With an overall length of 1″ they are a real option for the smallest of pico’s or the largest reefs. Like many of the colorful Trimma and Eviota gobies currently being imported, Trimma cana is often collected in Cebu–which has made a name for itself through the collectiom of various Gobiidae species.

    Size may matter in some cases, but for Trimma cana, its shortcomings are easily made up for in color and personality.

    5 Comments

    1. October 29, 2009 at 10:08 AM | Permalink

      Great looking fish, think the 12g needs one 🙂

    2. Royce
      October 29, 2009 at 1:33 PM | Permalink

      “gobies of the Trimma genus were a rare site”

      Site?

    3. george
      October 29, 2009 at 5:24 PM | Permalink

      cool little fish. the photo is great!

      i looked up some different trimma and eviotas and i think i am hooked! is there a problem mixing species?

    4. lak
      November 1, 2009 at 3:31 PM | Permalink

      There isn’t a big problem mixing species, but some species don’t do well in groups (at least in small nano tanks). There is a great article on them in the July/August issue of Reef life magazine.

    5. December 4, 2009 at 5:28 PM | Permalink

      Awesome, just realized my photo of my trimma cana was linked from here =) thanks for the mention!

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