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    NP Bio Pellets, A New Carbon Dosing Method

    Our newest sponsor Aquarium Specialty has joined the GBD team with bang. This past week they announced that they are now the exclusive North American distributor of Reef Interests’ NP Bio Pellets. Some may remember we shared this innovative new carbon dosing method with you back in August, since that time interest in this pelletized carbon […]

    NP Biopellets

    Our newest sponsor Aquarium Specialty has joined the GBD team with bang. This past week they announced that they are now the exclusive North American distributor of Reef Interests’ NP Bio Pellets. Some may remember we shared this innovative new carbon dosing method with you back in August, since that time interest in this pelletized carbon source has grown significantly.

    np biopellets

    Tatu Vaajalahti showing off the bacterial growth taking place in his reverse flow filter

    NP Bio Pellets are a unique carbon based polymer that doubles as a substrate and food source for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Like adding a liquid carbon source such as Vodka or VSV, we still cannot control what bacteria are growing–however, these pellets should inherently provide more control through the location that the bacterial growth occurs (on the pellets!). It has been referred to as the Solid Vodka method for the large bacterial biomass that can be generated and then exported via protein skimming. Reef Interests, the manufacturer of NP Bio Pellets, has stated they have a patent on their unique biodegradable polymer.

    “NP-reducing BioPellets are composed of biologically degradable polymers that can be placed in a fluidized filter or filter canister. The pellets will allow aerobic growth of bacteria which consequently will consume nitrate and phosphate simultaneously. The bacteria will use up the carbon from the BioPellets, whilst nitrogen and phosphorus are taken from the water as nitrate and (ortho)phosphate. This conversion of organic BioPellets (together with inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus) into microbial biomass is called immobilization. In addition, anaerobic layers will develop, resulting in additional denitrification.”

    The product is very new to the market. Like with any organic carbon source there are risks and the use of these pellets is only advised for advanced aquarists. We plan on playing the guinea pig with this product and will update in the future.

    Pre-order pricing from Aquarium Specialty is currently $52.95 and $99.95 for 500ml and 1000ml respectively (500ml is good for 130 gallons). These are expected to arrive and ship out in 2 weeks.

    6 Comments

    1. Nicholas Sadaka
      November 2, 2009 at 12:02 PM | Permalink

      I wonder if you combined these pellets with dosing Zeovit’s Zeobac if that would allow you to control which bacteria would grow. I think it’s very risky mixing methods, but it was just a passing thought. Very interesting though…I wish I had a spare tank to try it on. Eric, do you know if it can be used on saltwater or freshwater? Thanks.

    2. Brandon
      November 2, 2009 at 12:22 PM | Permalink

      Can’t wait to see how they do in the glass box.

    3. Ryan
      November 2, 2009 at 1:57 PM | Permalink

      Nicholas, I was having the exact same thoughts about mixing it with zeobak. I already run zeovit fully but I am also interested in if you can mix the two.

    4. Nicholas Sadaka
      November 2, 2009 at 2:08 PM | Permalink

      Hey Ryan-I run full Zeo too, but wonder if the zeoliths, the zeostart and zeofood all might be able to be replaced by the pellets. Seems like with all the proprietary information with these systems, it’d probably be too hard to know to be able to do safely, but maybe worth trying in a test tank. It does seem like combining the two COULD be advantageous though…maybe?

    5. Tetsuo
      November 2, 2009 at 4:51 PM | Permalink

      I had used similar product?Polyhydroxybutanoate derivative? 2 years ago as Vodka method. I put it in the DIY ZEOvit reactor.
      It works to keep low nutrients however too much white bacteria (Pseudomonas sp.?) growth.
      Also issue is pH down.

      I strongly agree with using Zeovit’s Zeobac to controll bacteria.

    6. Errol
      March 19, 2010 at 10:24 AM | Permalink

      Will I use the bio pellets with a sulfur reactor? Thanks

    2 Trackbacks

    1. […] rise in popularity of organic carbon dosing (e.g. ZEOvit, Vodka, VSV or the latest solid form–NP Bio Pellets) are we better able to provide what may be a crucial food source for these […]

    2. […] now is carbon-based bacterial strain media like Kaldnes. This is what I am using currently: NP Bio Pellets Organic Carbon Dosing Method If you notice in the blog, it is based on this same concept of adding vodka that certain […]

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