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    EcoReef’s Ceramic Modules Restore Nature’s Reefs

    One of the latest trends in european reefkeeping has been ceramic rock structures. In a similar fashion Michael Moore and EcoReefs have created a ceramic structure to help restore natural reefs that have been pulverized by blast fishing. EcoReef’s cermic modules slide together and are permanently adhered via epoxy and cable ties. Once assembled they […]

    One of the latest trends in european reefkeeping has been ceramic rock structures. In a similar fashion Michael Moore and EcoReefs have created a ceramic structure to help restore natural reefs that have been pulverized by blast fishing.

    EcoReef’s cermic modules slide together and are permanently adhered via epoxy and cable ties. Once assembled they can be anchored to the seafloor to prevent their movement during storms, tidal changes, etc. Their antler like shape mimics the staghorn growth of certain Acroporas while providing ample space for coral growth and intricate channels underneath for juvenile fish.

    Once they are installed they are first colonized by algae and eventually corals. To enhance the recovery of the reefs, some corals are placed directly on the structure, much like aquarists fragment corals and adhere them to live rock. Interestingly, it has been observed that the structures that corals were attached via humans did not colonize or develop any faster then those that did not receive any additional help. It is estimated that with these ceramic structures the recovery time of pulverized reefs can be reduced from 50-100 years to just 7-15.

    The past two photos are from Seacology and EcoReefs colaborative effort in North Sulawesi. For more details on this project and information straight from Michael Moore–the creator of EcoReefs, check out this great video.

    4 Comments

    1. January 26, 2009 at 10:43 PM | Permalink

      That is really awesome, its good to see there are still collaborative efforts between the villagers and us foreigners to save the reefs over there. I like the table coral story:)

    2. Nicholas Sadaka
      January 27, 2009 at 1:08 PM | Permalink

      That is absolutely, indescribably awesome. So often there are so many stories out there that depress us and beat us down about the current state of our planet. This story elicits so much joy that is based on the knowledge of how much our planet “wants” to revert back to it’s “natural” form. When we remove the things we’ve put in place to damage the planet or try to repair our previous damage, nature fights and screams and claws better than the best mixed martial arts fighters to get back to where it was. In a time of such destruction, there IS in fact reason to be hopeful. I wish they would play this video on network TV for everyone to see. Thanks so much for sharing that-very, very inspirational.

    3. Dave
      January 28, 2009 at 12:34 PM | Permalink

      Great post. Thats the best reef video I’ve seen on Youtube!

    4. Nicolas Rix
      February 3, 2009 at 3:43 AM | Permalink

      I think this is great. All the time I think about reef conservation and all the time I hear about how our reefs are suffering, and as a reef keeper it’s helped me to understand how delicate reef animals are and what it takes to try and recreate nature in the home.

      Through that I have a strong feeling in my heart that we will eventually help save our planet. Just seeing that table coral somehow just made my heart jump the same way it did when I went snorkeling in Indonesia.

      Seeing a beautiful reef tank is one thing but seeing the real deal, just melts you down and helps you appreciate the world we live in.

    2 Trackbacks

    1. […] As aquarists we should be worried about the state of the oceans and coral reefs; I can assure you, blast fishing is not a sustainable practice…. To add some hope to an otherwise miserable story, check out what EcoReefs is doing to help rehabilitate damaged reefs. […]

    2. […] sursa […]

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