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    Brightwell NeoMarine Salt Sparks Debate

      Brightwell Aquatics new NeoMarine salt is sparking debate among aquarists. Not over the quality or animal response, but over the companies description of the salt mix. Brightwell’s NeoMarine literature states that tested numbers are spot on to natural sea water parameters (NSW). This of course has been said before, but what has most up […]

    NeoMarine Salt

     

    Brightwell Aquatics new NeoMarine salt is sparking debate among aquarists. Not over the quality or animal response, but over the companies description of the salt mix. Brightwell’s NeoMarine literature states that tested numbers are spot on to natural sea water parameters (NSW). This of course has been said before, but what has most up in arms is the precision in which the self-reported numbers of NeoMarine match NSW. The most interesting being Strontium, to which it states a measurement of  7.625 ppm, an number identical to NSW–to the thousandth. Brightwell claims that NeoMarine “is so close in composition to natural seawater that marine organisms cannot tell the difference.” Is it possible? Many say it’s not. Others are anxious to try a salt without inflated parameters.

     

    Brightwell Neo Marine

    The rear label of NeoMarine Salt. Photo by GBD reader Matt.

     

    A consistent, quick mixing salt that hits near NSW is a welcome addition to the hobby. While we cannot yet confirm the measurements that Brightwell claims, nor will we be able to with such precision, we hope the salt will deliver on the NSW parameters–although we’ll give them a decimal point or two. We do not expect a salt mix to be within .oo1ppm let alone 10ppm.   Early users of NeoMarine have reported to GBD that they are liking the new salt and the initial calcium and alkalinity values. Quick and clean mixing has also been mentioned by a few.

    While major elements are suggested to be spot on to NSW, minor trace elements are largely absent. Here’s what Brightwell has to say:

     

    First, all major elements are present in NeoMarine, however only minor and trace elements known to undergo biological and/or chemical interactions (e.g. depletion) in natural seawater are included. What this means is that there is a specific change (decrease) in the concentration profile of the element measured in the surface waters where life is concentrated; such elements are believed to interact with marine life and/or with other substances present in the water, and these elements are considered to exhibit “non-conservative” behavior.

    Elements that do not exhibit these characteristics do not apparently interact with marine life or these other substances (at least as far as current analytical methods can discern); they are not likely necessary for the continued health or existence of marine organisms. It follows that these elements are not required for success with a marine aquarium; in fact, if added they would gradually accumulate with time. Because of this, they may be omitted from the salt mix and the savings in raw materials and production procedures passed on to the aquarist.

     

     

    Like many Brightwell products, NeoMarine will have its lovers and haters. We do plan on testing the salt at some point. The same goes for Seachem’s Salinity salt that is under their Aquavitro line. What we do know now is Brightwell certainly knew it was stoking the fire. Lines like “For what it’s worth, the final formulation provides all major, minor, and trace elements at concentrations within 0.000001% (with the exception of chloride) of their respective average natural seawater concentrations“… are not including by accident or without thought.

    For the early adopters, NeoMarine can be purchased for $55 (good for 150 gallons of saltwater) and is available at Premium Aquatics and Salty Supply.

    Many thanks to Matt for the rear label photo.

    10 Comments

    1. July 31, 2009 at 7:30 AM | Permalink

      Sounds interesting. I would recommend KZ’s Reefers Best Salt – mixes quickly and gives me the levels I require for the ZEOvit method without tweaking on my part. Simply mix, and add.

    2. July 31, 2009 at 8:11 AM | Permalink

      Im anxious to try this salt at home, I will post any details…All i know if its made by chris its going to be high quality, im really impressed with his line. I try not to delve to deep into specifics, if it works I use it:)

    3. July 31, 2009 at 8:17 AM | Permalink

      +1 on KZ’s Reefers Best Salt! I just wish it was sold in buckets instead of boxes…

    4. stunreefer
      July 31, 2009 at 10:00 AM | Permalink

      I’ve switched from RBS to get Tanked Aquariums Formula 2 (NSW levels). Hand made salt that tests spot-on every time, unlike RBS IME.

      I don’t know why any company would “claim” stats like Brightwell did, those are just rediculous! However, I am excited to see how it tests out, and even more excited that there’s now another salt available with NSW params that should be quite consistant… we’ll see!

    5. g.quagmire
      July 31, 2009 at 12:28 PM | Permalink

      looks like albert theil and marc weiss had a lovechild,his name is chris brightwell

    6. reef
      July 31, 2009 at 2:41 PM | Permalink

      the new seachem salt looks good, found most salts are ok,

    7. Nicholas Sadaka
      July 31, 2009 at 3:45 PM | Permalink

      Shew, I was nervous when reading the headline. I need a salt like this for the Zeovit system, but RBS is a good deal pricier than Neo, so I was hoping Neo would be the answer to my prayers. In addition, over at the zeovit site, a little while back there was quite a bit of controversy over inconsistent batches with RBS which some found unacceptable for the price. I have been using the h/w mix from Drs Foster and Smith with decent enough results, but I’m hoping they may be better with Neo. Well, once I run out and give Neo a try, I’ll report back!

    8. July 31, 2009 at 7:15 PM | Permalink

      “is so close in composition to natural seawater that marine organisms cannot tell the difference.“

      Comments like that always make me laugh a little, like we’d ever know 🙂

    9. August 1, 2009 at 6:17 AM | Permalink

      I can guarantee that their salt when mixed is nowhere near as good as the one I use 😉 The Pacific Ocean mixes spot on, every single time. Damn quick too!

    10. ex-neo
      August 2, 2009 at 11:23 PM | Permalink

      it is unfortunate that he is using his self righteous ego to sell another of his over priced pseudo science products.
      he cant prove it works and we cant prove that it doesn’t.
      he says its dry salt mix, you buy it and combine it with water and you get ….saltwater..overpriced saltwater

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