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    Amphiprion mccullochi from LiveAquaria in HD Video

    When it comes to rare fish, Amphiprion mccullochi is a great example of sustainability within the trade. The fish shown in this video are actually first generation captive raised specimens from Ryan’s Reef in Australia. They were then grown out and paired up by Kevin Kohen and the LiveAquaria crew. Today they spawn like clockwork, […]

    When it comes to rare fish, Amphiprion mccullochi is a great example of sustainability within the trade. The fish shown in this video are actually first generation captive raised specimens from Ryan’s Reef in Australia. They were then grown out and paired up by Kevin Kohen and the LiveAquaria crew. Today they spawn like clockwork, providing LA the task of rearing.

    LiveAquaria’s Spawning Pair of Amphiprion mccullochi

    Kevin rears these fish in a specially modified tank that resides in his office. The aquarium utilizes dosing pumps for continuous waterchanges which in turn keeps the water clean and stable. So far they have been successful with multiple juvenile Mccullochi’s growing out at their facility. I was shocked to see them scattered through out their coral holding vats! Usually livestock businesses will keep tangs in these large tanks to control algae–I believe the only ones there were a Gem Tang and Sohal Tang! Instead juvenile Mcculloch’s were living among harems of Centropyges and other rarities.

    Juvenile A. mccullochi are particularly striking. The brief clip included in the above video is actually from MACNA were LA showed off their Mccullochs to the public for the first time.

    [Video taken with Canon 500d @ 720p w/ Canon 100m f/2.8 USM Macro.]

    8 Comments

    1. Nicholas Sadaka
      December 22, 2009 at 8:38 AM | Permalink

      How exactly does Kevin use dosing pumps for water changes? Sounds like an interesting idea. Thanks.

    2. Brandon
      December 22, 2009 at 9:22 AM | Permalink

      i have heard of people using 3 pumps for continous water changes. 1 for top off, 1 for pumping water out, and 1 to pump in new salt water. Not sure if that is what he is doing though. Cool video.

      What is the going rate for one of these beauties?

    3. Mike Clifford
      December 22, 2009 at 9:22 AM | Permalink

      @ Nicholas – I believe its through two dosing pumps set at the same dosing rate, one going from a new saltwater container to the tank, and the other going from the tank to a drain (pumping water out of the tank).

    4. Mark Poletti
      December 22, 2009 at 10:23 AM | Permalink

      Thanks for sharing the awesome video. Our hobby has made so many advances in just a short amount of time.

    5. Nicholas Sadaka
      December 22, 2009 at 1:29 PM | Permalink

      Thanks Mike…do you know how risky that is for floods? Its a great idea, but that’d be my main concern. I’ve recently started trying to do daily water changes manually, but it’s VERY hard to keep up with and not forget or put off…to automate it would REALLY help.

    6. December 22, 2009 at 4:18 PM | Permalink

      Here is the full story & history of the McCulloch’s at LiveAquaria. Kevin updated the blog for several months, though recently there isnt much new to say except the same thing over & over! Kevin went into a lot of detail on some of his posts: http://www.liveaquaria.com/general/general.cfm?general_pagesid=476

      Thanks Eric for the great video & post!
      -Melissa

    7. george
      December 22, 2009 at 4:50 PM | Permalink

      LOL 2 stars. someone is trying to hate on the video!

      i think i could guess who and they are idiots. awesome video eric.

    8. Jeremy Maneyapanda
      December 27, 2009 at 8:53 AM | Permalink

      Im not sure how Kevin does it, but it seems pretty easy to me. One dosing pump pushing fresh saltwater in, overflow to the drain = constant water change. It still blows my mind how landmark an event this is for reefkeeping, no less here in the states. Kudos to Kohen.

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