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    Reef News | ORA Bellina Acropora, Euro-Reef Nano Skimmer, Clownfish Smell Leaves?, Earliest form of Sushi, Sea Monster Caught on Video

    Oceans Reefs and Aquariums, otherwise known by the acronym ORA, has come up with another limited release Acropora. Named after the beautiful orchid  Phalaenopsis bellina, this Acropora has a purple skin with green polyps. As of now it looks to be Acropora desalwii (not to be confused with A. plana), but we will have to see how it […]

    Oceans Reefs and Aquariums, otherwise known by the acronym ORA, has come up with another limited release Acropora. Named after the beautiful orchid  Phalaenopsis bellina, this Acropora has a purple skin with green polyps. As of now it looks to be Acropora desalwii (not to be confused with A. plana), but we will have to see how it matures. Here’s a photo taken under natural sunlight and quote from ORA. 

     The Bellina Acro

    “With a shape and growth pattern very similar to our famous Roscoe’s Acropora, Bellina stands on it’s own with a violet base and contrasting green to yellow polyps which show outstanding extension and movement in strong current. Like all of our small polyp stony corals, the Bellina Acro can be acclimated to a wide variety of high output aquarium lighting. Strong intermittent current is recommended to keep the polyps out for your customers to see. Quantities are limited and the demand is expected to be extremely high for this unique and eye catching Acropora.”

    Euro-Reef has created a new website showing prototypes of their new nano skimmer. They have also put a video up on viddler, here. Shown below are the 2″ and 2.5″ OD models that are powered by an 8.3w Cal Pump with a new impeller design.

     

    Scientists have been baffled how young clown fish swept away from their birth place by the ocean’s currents can often find their way back home. It turns out they can smell leaves. Even those that were captive bred were attracted to the scent of anemones and leaves, suggesting it is an innate sense.

    Did prehistoric humans feed on giant clams? Tridacna costata maybe the first example of “marine overexploitation” and sushi.

    Thanks to Coral Morphologic for sharing this, and StonyReef  for bringing it to our attention. This was shot from an oil rig at 7,828 ft in the Mississippi Canyon Trench in the Gulf of Mexico… a true creature of the deep.

     

    One Comment

    1. August 29, 2008 at 2:01 PM | Permalink

      That squid footage is insane! Can’t believe that lives in the sea… makes you wonder what else is down there…

    One Trackback

    1. […] of their corals fit this color scheme with similar bottle brush growth (Roscoes, Joe the Coral, Bellina…) However, we have hope for this Blue Iris species. Notice the elongated coralites? […]

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