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    Diver’s Den | 5 Rare Animals That Go Unnoticed

    With the recent posts dedicated to rare fish, I’ve been hit with many e-mails asking where they can be attained. Many times when it comes to these rarities it’s about timing and opportunity. Like many of you nearly every evening after dinner I head over to LiveAquaria’s Diver’s Den to see if Kevin Kohen and the LA […]

    With the recent posts dedicated to rare fish, I’ve been hit with many e-mails asking where they can be attained. Many times when it comes to these rarities it’s about timing and opportunity.

    Like many of you nearly every evening after dinner I head over to LiveAquaria’s Diver’s Den to see if Kevin Kohen and the LA team have posted some new rare livestock. Today as I was checking I couldn’t believe some of the fish that are still available and not sold!

    The good news for these fish is they have had adequate time to adapt to captivity. The bad news is there seems to be no interest in these beauties! This is not necessarily bad news, but it is a reflection of aquarists here in the States. In my opinion, all of these should have sold within hours of being posted. Many of the rarest fish are ignored because they are not trendy of have a high price tag, here’s some to consider:

    Here’s my list of 5 rare, handsome, and skipped over specimens currently available. 

    #1 Chaetodon mitratus this tiny juvenile is only 1.75″, need I say more? This is a hardy and beautiful butterfly perfect for the advanced aquarist that is ready to add a rare fish to their reef.

    #2 Liopropoma multilineatum, The Many Lined Basslet is a beautiful and unusual Liopropoma species that is often overshadowed by it’s relatives L. carambi and L. swalesi. This striking fish is not commonly offered or collected, but LiveAquaria.com added another one to their Diver’s Den line up. The specimen below has been posted on Diver’s Den since August 26th!

    #3 Prognathodes marcellae, The Marcellae Butterfly hails from West Africa and is another rare, but often ignored fish. The strong dorsal spines and golden coloration make this a true show stopper. Some may recognize the shape of this fish, as it is very similar to  Prognathodes aya.

    #4 Urocaridella sp., This striking ornamental shrimp may not command the same price as the fish above, but it is still a choice invertebrate! Shrimps like these are not commonly offered for sale in the States.

     

    #5 Zebrasom gemmatum, The Gem Tang is well… expensive, but I do find them alluring and sophisticated. The price on Gem Tangs will not be changing soon, and for that reason they are often skipped over or mocked. This fish slid on the list just before the Joculator Pygmy Angel, only because of the different shape and color when compared to the previously listed fish. Some say they would rather have a Yellow Tang than a Gem, but not me. If this fish wasn’t so cost prohibitive I think they would be a very popular species. 

    These 5 animals would make an impressive stocking list for any tank. They will likely sit at LiveAquaria for awhile longer, but they are worth highlighting as thousands of people pass over them each night during their evening check of new Diver’s Den additions. 

    10 Comments

    1. charles
      October 23, 2008 at 3:29 AM | Permalink

      I would pick the gem over the yellow tang anyday.

    2. October 23, 2008 at 10:21 AM | Permalink

      I wouldnt say those species go ‘unnoticed’, I thought you were gonna pick rare weirdos like the plectrypops, powder hybrid and some small funky fish.

    3. October 23, 2008 at 10:43 AM | Permalink

      Jake,

      Unnoticed to you and to the masses are two different things 😉 Most have never heard of Prognathodes or L. multilineatum. Most also have never considered shrimp beyond Scarlet Cleaners and Peppermints. I’ll give you the Plectrypops. It’s been there for ages, but truthfully I would not put that in my reef display…

      Make your list and let’s compare.

    4. October 23, 2008 at 12:39 PM | Permalink

      I’m digging all the shrimp they’ve had up as of late. Unfortunately, I can’t currently accommodate any of them. Too bad.

    5. Michael
      October 23, 2008 at 1:28 PM | Permalink

      I have been looking at the tiny Mitratus. I just dont know how he would do with my angels. Probably fine….Hmmm Maybe I should just get him.

      ~Michael

    6. Andrew
      October 27, 2008 at 7:05 PM | Permalink

      That Gem Tang is gorgeous! I love the contrast of a black and white fish in a SPS tank with brightly colored SPS.

    7. January 5, 2009 at 11:18 PM | Permalink

      I believe the photo of that Mitratus is the one I ended up purchasing. It’s very tiny, and only took to Arcti-pods and chopped mysis at first but is eating just about everything now. It shares the tank with tilefish and anthias. Great website!

    8. January 6, 2009 at 6:11 PM | Permalink

      Hi Matt,

      Thanks for the kind words, and very nice pick up on the C. mitratus!

    9. January 9, 2009 at 11:51 AM | Permalink

      Hi Eric,

      You have written some great articles. I am on an importer and I know Kevin, you are right, GREAT GUY!

      I only got to read a couple articles but mark my word, I will be back!

      Do you email anything stating when a new article has been released?

      THANKS AGAIN!

    10. January 12, 2009 at 9:27 PM | Permalink

      Hi Rebecca,

      Thanks for stopping by! To stay up on all the updates on the site you can catch on to our RSS feed by clicking the orange logo at the top right of the page or via this link here: feed://feeds.feedburner.com/GlassboxDesign

      You will need to enter it into a RSS readers like Google reader or bloglines:
      http://www.google.com/reader
      http://www.bloglines.com/

      If you need any help getting that set up, feel free to shoot me an e-mail: info (at) glassbox-design.com

      -Eric

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