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    Rhynchocinetes durbanensis, the cure?

    Korallen Zucht was posted on their home site and forums the recent success had with Rhynchocinetes durbanensis, commonly known as camel shrimp, eating acropora eating flatworms and montipora eating snails. here is a quote from the site…“Very annoying the small beasts! Acropora and Montipora are becoming pale, colorless and the tissue is getting thinner and […]

    Korallen Zucht was posted on their home site and forums the recent success had with Rhynchocinetes durbanensis, commonly known as camel shrimp, eating acropora eating flatworms and montipora eating snails. here is a quote from the site…“Very annoying the small beasts! Acropora and Montipora are becoming pale, colorless and the tissue is getting thinner and thinner until it completely dies. Acropora flatworms and Monti snails are dangerous enemies for our corals!As iodine bathing of the corals is rather time consuming, have to be repeated several times and are highly stressing the coral which is already damaged by the pest we tried something new: A cleaning station for the corals!Within 30 to 60 minutes the shrimp Rhynchocinetes durbanensis cleans the corals completely in our separate shrimp tank. Acropora flatworms as well as their eggs and Montipora snails are eaten completely.Caution: We recommend to keep the shrimp separately in another tank, because the shrimp will eat the coral tissue as well after all flatworms, eggs and snails are eaten. If the coral remains a whole day in the shrimp tank, the complete tissue also is munched! The coral hence should remain only 30 to 60 minutes in the cleaning station and then back into the coral tank.”

    One Comment

    1. Anonymous
      November 21, 2007 at 7:19 PM | Permalink

      nice job on your website.

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